The Influences of Conservative Christianity, Rastafari and Dance Hall Music within Jamaica on Homophobia and Stigma against People Living with HIV and AIDS

Main Article Content

Roderick Hewitt

Abstract

This article argues that the conservative patriarchal bias Christianity of the Jamaican churches’ understanding of human sexualities, Rastafari’s selective use of the Hebrew Scriptures to oppose homosexuality and the rouge masculinities and the anti-LGBT (Lesbians, Gays Bi-sexual and Lesbian Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender community) narrative culture of Dance hall music constitute three potent sub-cultural forces within Jamaican context that promote negative influences of homophobia and stigma against people living with HIV. Inspite of intense and persistent international pressure from LGBT and other human rights groups to force the government of Jamaica to change the colonial bequeathed laws that discriminate against homosexuals, public opposition from religious groups have also prevented the government from taking steps to liberalize and legalize homosexuality. In order for a more enlightened attitude towards the LGBT community and victims of HIV and AIDS to emerge within Jamaica fundamental changes are needed in the embedded conservative church and Rastafari theologies on human sexuality. Also the anti-LGBT and hegemonic masculinities narrative culture of Dance hall music must give way to conscious advocacy of healthy life affirming gender relationships.

Article Details

How to Cite
Hewitt, R. (2016). The Influences of Conservative Christianity, Rastafari and Dance Hall Music within Jamaica on Homophobia and Stigma against People Living with HIV and AIDS. Alternation Journal, 23(2), 169-184. Retrieved from https://journals.ukzn.ac.za/index.php/soa/article/view/1281
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Articles
Author Biography

Roderick Hewitt, University of KwaZulu-Natal

 Hewitt@ukzn.ac.za