A Discursive Discourse on the Tragic Delimits in the Development of Post-independence Africa, Twentieth Century to Twenty-first Century

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BEN-AKINDURO O. CHRISTIANAH

Abstract

This article discusses intrusions in the emergence of a nation, and its cooperation with the truncating of its growth. It is argued that development is the cumulation of gradual processes built on the identity of a nation, which would lead to nationhood. Africa’s development, eroded by imperialism, has suffered delimits because agitations for independence were not distilled in nationhood. Political imbalances, aggravated by religion and ethnocentrism, polarised the unity within these nations to frustrate meaningful development. Another veil cast on Africa was the different interpretations of pan-Africanism or ‘African socialism’ by Africa’s founding leaders.Today, nations in Africa are shackled as developing economies by its tragic delimits. Leadership laxities are excused and stirrup on the exploitation of imperialism. Episodes-in-history documented in this write-up, reveal Africa’s stalking at development. Nevertheless, indicators such as human capital, resourced land, in natural and mineral resources, suggest that unalloyed development in Africa is possible. This paper is a discursive discourse on the problems besetting development in post-independence Africa. It concludes that, capable leadership, with strategic policies and implementation, will build Africa.

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How to Cite
CHRISTIANAH, B.-A. (2018). A Discursive Discourse on the Tragic Delimits in the Development of Post-independence Africa, Twentieth Century to Twenty-first Century. African Journal Of Governance & Development, 7(1), 17-33. Retrieved from https://journals.ukzn.ac.za/index.php/jgd/article/view/702
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