Changes in Physicians’ Practice Using a Cardiologic Tele-expertise network in Mongolia: An Ethnographic Study on Implementation of Technology in Medical Practice

  • Sonia Molho 1) MON/005 project, LuxDev agency, Luxembourg 2) Maastricht University, The Netherlands 3) APHP, Paris, France
  • Dagva Mungunchimeg 1) MON/005 project, LuxDev agency, Luxembourg 2) Shastin Hospital, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
  • Agnes Meershoek Research School Caphri, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
  • Didier Patte MON/005 project, LuxDev agency, Luxembourg
  • Namsrainaidan Bayasgala 1) MON/005 project, LuxDev agency, Luxembourg 2)Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Keywords: telemedicine, qualitative research, Mongolia, cardiovascular diseases, collaboration

Abstract

The Luxembourg Government has supported the Mongolian Government in cardiologic care since 2001 through a telemedicine project. The fundamental strategy was to create a centre disseminating knowledge and providing assistance to physicians through a tele-expertise network. To better understand what factors contributed to the successful implementation of the project. This ethnographic study aims to understand how the project has changed doctors’ practice to identify elements that facilitate acceptance of telemedicine.  A qualitative approach based on the central role played by physicians was used. The purpose of this research is to contribute to the development of telemedicine in capitalising on the experience of the Mongolian telemedicine project. We gathered physicians’ insights through participant observation and in-depth interviews of nineteen physicians of the project, added to focus group interviews including nine physicians from the most remote provinces. Our findings show that the technical and social aspects of the project reinforce each other in fostering doctors’ greater autonomy, creating a sense of belonging to a community and promoting ownership of the project, crucial elements for acceptance. The project offers technological support through a tele-expertise network and a dedicated website that help improving professional capacities and participate in increasing physicians’ self-confidence and autonomy. Meanwhile, the technological structure is supported by strong collaboration between  physicians, their participation to the project development and involvement toward new professional activities. It results in structuring a community of cardiologists with a great sense of belonging and ownership that created a social environment for the technology to work.

Author Biographies

Sonia Molho, 1) MON/005 project, LuxDev agency, Luxembourg 2) Maastricht University, The Netherlands 3) APHP, Paris, France

Public health resident, APHP, France;

Master student in global health, Maastricht University, the Netherlands

Dagva Mungunchimeg, 1) MON/005 project, LuxDev agency, Luxembourg 2) Shastin Hospital, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

MD, Project coordinator

Agnes Meershoek, Research School Caphri, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
PhD, Research School Caphri, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
Didier Patte, MON/005 project, LuxDev agency, Luxembourg
MD, International Project Advisor
Namsrainaidan Bayasgala, 1) MON/005 project, LuxDev agency, Luxembourg 2)Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
MD, Project scientific advisor

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Published
2016-12-06
How to Cite
Molho, S., Mungunchimeg, D., Meershoek, A., Patte, D., & Bayasgala, N. (2016). Changes in Physicians’ Practice Using a Cardiologic Tele-expertise network in Mongolia: An Ethnographic Study on Implementation of Technology in Medical Practice. Journal of the International Society for Telemedicine and EHealth, 4, e30 (1-7). Retrieved from https://journals.ukzn.ac.za/index.php/JISfTeH/article/view/173
Section
Original Research