Antenatal Exercise Program Using Motion-based Games: A Pilot Study Among Expectant Mothers in Selected Rural Areas in the Philippines

  • Jenica Ana Ayson Rivero Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
  • Christian Verzosa Del Rosario Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
  • Clarence Jan Hernandez Concepcion Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
  • Michael Joseph Sarmiento Diño Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima UniversityOur Lady of Fatima University
  • Jewel Molila Refran Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
  • Mardy Ortega Malinao Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
  • Aiko Mayumi Paner Cerdan Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
  • Divine Grace Vela Marquez Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
  • Alvin Ege Patrocino Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
  • Paner Cerdan Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
Keywords: health informatics, exergame, motion-based, antenatal, anxiety, depression

Abstract

A structured exercise programme was designed that incorporates motion-based video games to decrease anxiety and depression among pregnant women. A pilot study determined its viability. Methods: A 2-group pre- post-test experiment was done on 16 pregnant women who met study criteria. Eight underwent the structured exercise programme twice a week for a month (intervention), and eight did not (control). The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were adapted and used to determine participants’ anxiety and depression scores, respectively. Results: Significant improvement in the participants’ mean anxiety (48.50 to 42.88, p=0.029) and depression (11.50 to 7.63, p=0.022) scores were found after the exercise programme. No changes were noted in the control group, HADS (p=0.196) and STAI (p=0.714) confirming the strength of the scores of the experimental group. Conclusion: The results suggest the exercise programme can be a valid approach to decrease anxiety and depression among pregnant women. We recommend replication of this study to other geographical areas with more samples to establish generalizability.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Jenica Ana Ayson Rivero, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
Assistant Research Director, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
Christian Verzosa Del Rosario, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
Research Specialist, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
Clarence Jan Hernandez Concepcion, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
Faculty of the College of Nursing, Our Lady of Fatima University
Michael Joseph Sarmiento Diño, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima UniversityOur Lady of Fatima University
Director, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
Jewel Molila Refran, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University
University Statistician, Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University

References

Gaynes BN, Gavin N, Meltzer-Brody S, et al. Perinatal depression: prevalence, screening accuracy, and screening outcomes. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Summ) 2005 Feb;(119):1–8.

Chan CY, Lee AM, Lam SK, et al. Antenatal anxiety in the first trimester: Risk factors and effects on anxiety and depression in the third trimester and 6-week postpartum. OJ Psych 2013; 3(3):301-310.

Field T, Diego M, Hernandez-Reif M. Prenatal depression effects on the fetus and newborn: a review. Infant Behav Dev 2006 ;29(3):445-455.

Field T, Diego M, Hernandez-Reif M, et al. Comorbid depression and anxiety effects on pregnancy and neonatal outcome. Infant Behav Dev 2010;33(1):23–29.

Figueiredo B, Pacheco A, Costa R, Conde A, Teixeira C. Mother’s anxiety and depression during the third pregnancy trimester and neonate’s mother versus stranger’s face/voice visual preference. Early Hum Dev 2010;86(8):479–485.

Van den Bergh BRH, Mulder EJH, Mennes M, Glover V. Antenatal maternal anxiety and stress and the neurobehavioural development of the fetus and child: links and possible mechanisms. A review. Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2005;29(2):237–258.

Hammer RL, Perkins J, Parr R. Exercise during the childbearing year. J Perinatal Educ 2000;9(1):1–14.

Lokey EA, Tran ZV, Wells CL, Myers BC, Tran AC. Effects of physical exercise on pregnancy outcomes: a meta-analytic review. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1991;23(11):1234–1239.

Spielberger C. Manual for the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. rev. ed. Palo Alto (CA), Consulting Psychologists Press, 1983.

Zigmond AS, Snaith RP. The hospital anxiety and depression scale. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1983;67(6):361-370.

Rosenberg D, Depp CA, Vahia IV, et al. Exergames for subsyndromal depression in older adults: A pilot study of a novel intervention. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 2010;18(3):221–226.

Salguero A, Martínez-García R, Molinero O, Márquez S. Physical activity, quality of life and symptoms of depression in community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults. Arch Gerontol Geriat 2011;53(2):152–157.

Van Uffelen JGZ, van Gellecum YR, Burton NW, Peeters G, Heesch KC, Brown WJ. Sitting-time, physical activity, and depressive symptoms in mid-aged women. Am J Prev Med 2013;45(3):276–281.

Oh Y, Yang SP. Defining exergames & exergaming. Meaningful play. 2010 Conference Paper; Michigan State University, East Lansing (MI): 2010.

Song H, Kim J, Lee KM. Virtual vs. real body in exergames: Reducing social physique anxiety in exercise experiences. Comp Human Behav 2014;36:282–5.

Mellecker RR, McManus AM. Active video games and physical activity recommendations: A comparison of the Gamercize Stepper, XBOX Kinect and XaviX J-Mat. J Sci Med Sport 2014;17(3):288–292.

Mills A, Rosenberg M, Stratton G, et al. The effect of exergaming on vascular function in children. J Pediatr 2013;163(3):806–810.

Gunter GA, Kenny RF, Vick EH. Taking educational games seriously: using the RETAIN model to design endogenous fantasy into standalone educational games. EducatTechnol Res Devel 2008;56(5-6):511–537.

Published
2015-04-12
How to Cite
Rivero, J. A., Del Rosario, C., Concepcion, C. J., Diño, M. J., Refran, J., Malinao, M., Cerdan, A. M., Marquez, D. G., Patrocino, A., & Cerdan, P. (2015). Antenatal Exercise Program Using Motion-based Games: A Pilot Study Among Expectant Mothers in Selected Rural Areas in the Philippines. Journal of the International Society for Telemedicine and EHealth, 3, e9 (1-4). Retrieved from https://journals.ukzn.ac.za/index.php/JISfTeH/article/view/113
Section
Special Theme: Women in eHealth